Sailing Through a Virtual Sea!

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Nolwandle
September 3, 2008
September 2, 2008
A171 HMS Endurance enters the harbour. Below her is the buckled bow of the Uruguay frigate ROU-2 Comandante Pedro Campbell, awaiting repair following a collision with her sister frigate ROU-1 Uruguay during the recent ATLASUR exercises off the South African coast Picture by David Erickson via ports.co.za

A171 HMS Endurance enters the harbour. Below her is the buckled bow of the Uruguay frigate ROU-2 Comandante Pedro Campbell, awaiting repair following a collision with her sister frigate ROU-1 Uruguay during the recent ATLASUR exercises off the South African coast Picture by David Erickson via ports.co.za

A171 HMS Endurance makes her approach to Simon’s Town Naval Harbour, with tugs ZTRF Indlovu and ZTTS Tshukudu in attendance.On the extreme left, the Museum Ship CS Cable Restorer and the Environmental Protection vessel Ruth First. On the other side of the quay from these are the Hydrographic Survey vessel A324 SAS Protea (white hull) and the Uruguay frigate ROU-1, Uruguay.Three of the four South African ‘Valour’ class frigates are visible (the fourth is in the dry dock): Left to right these are F145 SAS Amatola, F146 SAS Isandlwana and F147 SAS Spioenkop.The South African Combat Support vessel A301 SAS Drakensberg lies across the quay from F145/F146.Mine Hunter vessels M1212 SAS Umhloti and M1142 SAS Umzimkulu, with the P1552 SAS Tobie, P1553 SAS Tern and the Sealab 1 in the still water basin. Other vessels in the still water basin are (L-R) the tugs De Neys and ZTAG Umalusi, the distinctive ‘horns’ of the oldest SA Navy vessel in active service, Yard Craft 221, otherwise known as the ‘Mooring Lighter’ dating from 1901, two brand new Police Sea Border Patrol Vessels ZR7322 Inkosazana and ZR7401 Indlovukazi, and the new type 209 submarine SAS S103 Queen Modjadji I. Picture by David Erickson via ports.co.za

A171 HMS Endurance makes her approach to Simon’s Town Naval Harbour, with tugs ZTRF Indlovu and ZTTS Tshukudu in attendance.
On the extreme left, the Museum Ship CS Cable Restorer and the Environmental Protection vessel Ruth First. On the other side of the quay from these are the Hydrographic Survey vessel A324 SAS Protea (white hull) and the Uruguay frigate ROU-1, Uruguay.
Three of the four South African ‘Valour’ class frigates are visible (the fourth is in the dry dock): Left to right these are F145 SAS Amatola, F146 SAS Isandlwana and F147 SAS Spioenkop.
The South African Combat Support vessel A301 SAS Drakensberg lies across the quay from F145/F146.
Mine Hunter vessels M1212 SAS Umhloti and M1142 SAS Umzimkulu, with the P1552 SAS Tobie, P1553 SAS Tern and the Sealab 1 in the still water basin.
Other vessels in the still water basin are (L-R) the tugs De Neys and ZTAG Umalusi, the distinctive ‘horns’ of the oldest SA Navy vessel in active service, Yard Craft 221, otherwise known as the ‘Mooring Lighter’ dating from 1901, two brand new Police Sea Border Patrol Vessels ZR7322 Inkosazana and ZR7401 Indlovukazi, and the new type 209 submarine SAS S103 Queen Modjadji I.
Picture by David Erickson via ports.co.za

The harbour tug MKHUZE being lowered into the water for the first time in 2003, having been built at the Southern Africa Shipyards in Durban where five new and more powerful tugs are under construction for the TNPA. Siemens was the electrical sub contractor on the earlier tug buildings as well. Picture Terry Hutson via ports.co.za

The harbour tug MKHUZE being lowered into the water for the first time in 2003, having been built at the Southern Africa Shipyards in Durban where five new and more powerful tugs are under construction for the TNPA. Siemens was the electrical sub contractor on the earlier tug buildings as well. Picture Terry Hutson
via ports.co.za

Equally colourful is the container ship KOTA NABIL making her maiden visit to Cape Town in September 2007. Picture by Ian Shiffman via ports.co.za

Equally colourful is the container ship KOTA NABIL making her maiden visit to Cape Town in September 2007. Picture by Ian Shiffman via ports.co.za

The container ship KOTA NAGA makes a colourful sight while manoeuvring in Cape Town harbour last week. Picture Aad Noorland via ports.co.za

The container ship KOTA NAGA makes a colourful sight while manoeuvring in Cape Town harbour last week. Picture Aad Noorland via ports.co.za

Sunday 24 August 2008: The two Uruguayan vessels raise anchors in readiness to depart for their long voyage home, with the South African Hydrographic Survey vessel A324 SAS Protea at far right. Picture by David Erickson via ports.co.za

Sunday 24 August 2008: The two Uruguayan vessels raise anchors in readiness to depart for their long voyage home, with the South African Hydrographic Survey vessel A324 SAS Protea at far right. Picture by David Erickson
via ports.co.za

vWith a plume of smoke from her funnel, the Uruguayan Frigate ROU-2 Comandante Pedro Campbell gathers speed as she leaves Simon’s Town Naval Harbour in the company of three SA Navy tugs Umalusi, De Neys and Tshukudu, to thunderous roars from the sirens of the other SA Navy vessels in port – a farewell tribute after a stay of more than three months. Picture by David Erickson via ports.co.za

vWith a plume of smoke from her funnel, the Uruguayan Frigate ROU-2 Comandante Pedro Campbell gathers speed as she leaves Simon’s Town Naval Harbour in the company of three SA Navy tugs Umalusi, De Neys and Tshukudu, to thunderous roars from the sirens of the other SA Navy vessels in port – a farewell tribute after a stay of more than three months. Picture by David Erickson via ports.co.za

Saturday 23 August 2008: The three South African Navy tugs Umalusi, De Neys and Tshukudu spray their fire-fighting monitors as a farewell tribute to the Uruguayan Frigate ROU-1, Uruguay as she departs Simon’s Town Naval Harbour. In the foreground are the SA Navy Fleet Support Vessel A-301 SAS Drakensberg and Frigate F146 SAS Isandlwana. Picture by David Erickson report by David Erickson On Saturday 23 August 2008 the two Uruguayan frigates ROU-1 Uruguay and ROU-2 Comandante Pedro Campbell left Simon’s Town Naval Harbour. The two vessels have been undergoing repairs after a collision in May 2008 during adverse weather conditions whilst en route from Portugal to South Africa for joint exercises.  They have been at Simon’s Town since May. Both vessels were escorted from the harbour by the tugs Umalusi, De Neys and Tshukudu to thunderous roars from the sirens of the SA Navy ships in the port. The three tugs then sprayed their fire-fighting water monitors as a farewell tribute.  Both vessels anchored in Simon’s Bay overnight, where they were joined by the SA Hydrographic Survey vessel A324 SAS Protea. The Uruguayan vessels raised anchors at 09h00 on Sunday 24 August 2008 and then headed for home. It will be their first homecoming – both ships had been purchased from Portugal just prior to their voyage to South Africa, and they have never been to Uruguay.  No doubt after many months away from home, their crews will be overjoyed to be reunited with their loved ones. via ports.co.za

Saturday 23 August 2008: The three South African Navy tugs Umalusi, De Neys and Tshukudu spray their fire-fighting monitors as a farewell tribute to the Uruguayan Frigate ROU-1, Uruguay as she departs Simon’s Town Naval Harbour. In the foreground are the SA Navy Fleet Support Vessel A-301 SAS Drakensberg and Frigate F146 SAS Isandlwana. Picture by David Erickson


report by David Erickson

On Saturday 23 August 2008 the two Uruguayan frigates ROU-1 Uruguay and ROU-2 Comandante Pedro Campbell left Simon’s Town Naval Harbour. The two vessels have been undergoing repairs after a collision in May 2008 during adverse weather conditions whilst en route from Portugal to South Africa for joint exercises.

They have been at Simon’s Town since May. Both vessels were escorted from the harbour by the tugs Umalusi, De Neys and Tshukudu to thunderous roars from the sirens of the SA Navy ships in the port. The three tugs then sprayed their fire-fighting water monitors as a farewell tribute.

Both vessels anchored in Simon’s Bay overnight, where they were joined by the SA Hydrographic Survey vessel A324 SAS Protea. The Uruguayan vessels raised anchors at 09h00 on Sunday 24 August 2008 and then headed for home.

It will be their first homecoming – both ships had been purchased from Portugal just prior to their voyage to South Africa, and they have never been to Uruguay.

No doubt after many months away from home, their crews will be overjoyed to be reunited with their loved ones. via ports.co.za